Moral Character Is As Important To Eva Moskowitz As Academics

Education has always played a major role in the life of Success Academy founder Eva Moskowitz who spent a long career passing through various educational institutions as she sought to continue her education in its most effective form.

The issues seen by Eva Moskowitz in the Harlem public school system prompted her to run for office in local government on a series of reform policies in Harlem and across New York; the Johns Hopkins graduate became known in political circles for her skills as an investigator who was known to look at every possible aspect of the Harlem public school system as she set out to create a better experience for students across Harlem and the 32 campuses across the state of New York.

 

Eva Moskowitz founded the Success Academy in 2006 and has seen the Harlem school become a national blue ribbon educational institution, one of only 200 across the U.S. The founder of the Success Academy has seen the school outperform Harlem’s public school system in terms of test results, but for Eva Moskowitz the need to build positive members of society is far more important than simply achieving academic success; the academic achievements of Eva Moskowitz saw her become a History professor and an important member of the Prep for Prep group that provided mentors for gifted students from minority backgrounds. Using her own knowledge of the education system has seen Eva become a major part of the national education reform movement as the charter school system she founded is now seen as a major part of the success achieved in new York and beyond on behalf of students who may not have been able to achieve similar levels of achievement in the public school system.

 

The Success Academy has been a major success for Eva Moskowitz and the thousands of students who attend these charter schools on a regular basis where a common sense approach to school is being taken. One aspect of education that has been addressed at Success Academy is the return of an education focused on the children, not on making it as easy as possible for adults to operate the public school system in the easiest possible form.